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In preparation for recitals and to achieve progress at weekly lessons,  students have challenged themselves by asking the question: 
“What can I do to move my performance of a song from GOOD to GREAT?” 
This thought process has actively engaged the students. 
They take more ownership in creating a musical performance.
“Greatness is not a function of circumstance.
Greatness, it turns out, is largely a matter ofconscious choice, and discipline.

— Jim Collins,author of Good to Great
You can help students determine if they accomplished their goals
when sharing your thoughts after listening to practices and performances. 
 Some examples of sharing goal-focused feedback to students are…
 I could clearly hear the difference between your
soft “piano” sounds and your loud “forte” sounds.
You really captured the mood – the spirit – the feelings of that piece!
While you were playing, I could actually see…
the soldiers marching, the baby sleeping, the dancers spinning, etc.
 What an excellent job of keeping the beat; I was tapping my foot with you.
You kept the energy going from the beginning all the way to the end!
That second piece you played really made me smile.
Your memory skills are awesome.
It was amazing that you could focus and play all those notes by heart.
All students value encouragement – it helps when learning a new piece, repeating the technique exercises and focusing during another practice session. 
Thank you for your continual support and cheerleading.